Publications

Transboundary Animal
Diseases/Mortality Management 

Animal mortality management continues to pose significant biosecurity, environmental, and economic challenges during animal disease outbreaks. Including mortality management as an integral part of the emergency planning process can improve the effectiveness of the overall disease eradication effort.

Carcass Management for Small and Medium-Scale Livestock farms – Practical considerations

FOA No. 13, October 2018. 

Aboveground Burial for Managing Catastrophic Losses of Livestock

Int J One Health 3: 50 56, 2017.

Composting Livestock 2017: Livestock Mortality Composting Protocol

United States Department of Agriculture Guidance. August 15, 2017. 

Mesophyllic Static Pile Composting of Animal Carcasses

BioCycle.  Volume 58, No. 3, P 65 – 68. March & April 2017.

U.S. Response to Outbreaks of Avian Influenza

Domestic Preparedness Journal.  Volume 12, Issue 4, P 38 – 41. April 2016.

Composting Solution to Avian Flu Mortality Management

BioCycle. Volume. 57, No. 1, P 37 – 40.  January 2016.

Turkey Shoot

Chemical, Biological & Nuclear Warfare. Issue 01, P 80 82.  January 2016.

HPAI Outbreak 2014 – 2015: Mortality Composting Protocol for Avian Influenza Infected Flocks

United States Department of Agriculture Guidance. September 24, 2015.  

Guidelines for Composting Poultry Mortality as a Rapid Response to Avian Influenza

Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication. August 13, 2015.

A Producers Guide to Composting Poultry Mortality in Response to Avian Influenza – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication. August 12, 2015.

Catastrophic Livestock and Poultry Carcass Disposal

Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication. Retrieved June 19, 2014

Verification of Poultry Carcass Composting Research through Application during Actual Avian
Influenza Outbreaks

National Academy of Sciences – ILAR Journal. Volume 51, No. 2, P 149. March 2010

 

Natural Disaster Response 

Like every sector of the economy, natural disasters like hurricanes, tornados, and wildfires can cause tremendous damage to agricultural infrastructure and result in the death of thousands of animals. Failure to effectively manage animal carcasses following these disasters can result in significant economic, environmental, and public health impacts.

 

Counter-Agroterrorism

Agroterrorism is the deliberate use of biological agents (e.g., bacteria, viruses, toxins) against agricultural commodities, such as livestock or crops. The result
can include economic damage, loss of confidence in the food supply and
possible loss of life.

Anthrax and the City: Rethinking the Urban Anthrax Response

Chemical, Biological & Nuclear Warfare. Issue 01, P 44 – 47. January 2017.

 

Breaking Bad: Agent Overview — Ricin

Chemical, Biological & Nuclear Warfare. Issue 02, P 58 – 60. May 2016

 

Raising the BAR

Chemical, Biological & Nuclear Warfare. Issue 02, P 42 – 45. May 2015.

Making New Weapons

Chemical, Biological & Nuclear Warfare. Issue 01, P 30 – 32. January 2015.

 

Global Health Security/One Health 

With increasing global travel and trade resulting in more interactions between humans, wildlife, and livestock, infections disease threats are increasing
rapidly.  The One Health approach is the most effective way to manage
these disease threats.  

Combating Pandemic Threats – Global Health Security Agenda

DomPrep Journal. Volume 14, Issue 12, December 2018. 

One World, One Health

Chemical, Biological & Nuclear Warfare. Issue 02, P6063, May 2018.

Compreendendo a Conexão Entre Saúde Humana e Saúde Animal: o Conceito de Uma Saúde Única

2012.


Understanding the Connection Between Human and Animal Health: The OneHealth Concept

2011.

Understanding the Connection between Human and Animal Health

Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals. Volume 3, Issue 4, P 30. September 2010

 

Textbook Chapters

Water & Wastewater Analysis.  In H.L. Simmons (Ed.), Laboratory Science & Technology (pp. 135 – 140). College Station, TX: National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense (FAZD Center)

Laboratory Toxicology.  In H.L. Simmons (Ed.), Laboratory Science & Technology (pp. 141 – 146). College Station, TX: National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense

(FAZD Center)